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Government spending in the top ten U.S. states for public corruption is artificially higher by more than $1,300 per capita every year

Liu, Cheol and Mikesell, John L. (2014) Government spending in the top ten U.S. states for public corruption is artificially higher by more than $1,300 per capita every year. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (03 Jun 2014). Website.

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Abstract

In the minds of many, the government corruption tends to be a problem largely limited to developing countries. Yet, in new research Cheol Liu and John L. Mikesell, find that corruption across U.S. states is a major – and costly – problem. They find that the ten most corrupt states could have reduced their annual expenditure by more than $1,300 per capita, if their level of corruption was reduced to the states’ average. They also argue that public corruption influences how state resources are allocated to favor more “bribe-generating” spending such as construction, highways, correction, and police protection ahead of education, health and hospitals.

Item Type: Online resource (Website)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Authors; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: E History America > E151 United States (General)
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 13 Aug 2014 09:54
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2019 00:33
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/58938

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