Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

The bipartisanship of appointments to the foreign policy bureaucracy is more affected by domestic factors than international

Flynn, Michael (2014) The bipartisanship of appointments to the foreign policy bureaucracy is more affected by domestic factors than international. LSE American Politics and Policy (17 Mar 2014). Blog Entry.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (495kB) | Preview

Abstract

Many academics and commentators on American foreign policy have maintained that since the end of the Vietnam and Cold Wars, foreign policy-making has become subject to the kind of partisan political battles that have long afflicted domestic politics. By using data on over 1,000 individual appointees to the U.S. foreign policy bureaucracy Michael Flynn tests this view, and finds that there is no evidence to support the idea that bipartisanship in appointments has undergone a structural shift. He argues that domestic political conditions play an important part in promoting bipartisanship, and that as Congress has become more polarized, bipartisan appointments have become increasingly scarce. He warns that we should expect to see less bipartisan cooperation through presidential appointments in the future.

Item Type: Online resource (Blog Entry)
Official URL: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Author; Online
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: E History America > E11 America (General)
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Sets: Collections > LSE American Politics and Policy (USAPP) Blog
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2014 13:39
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 23:20
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/58799

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics