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Investigating changes in use of services by high-need families following the Helping Families Programme, an innovative parenting intervention for children with severe and persistent conduct problems.

Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science (2014) Investigating changes in use of services by high-need families following the Helping Families Programme, an innovative parenting intervention for children with severe and persistent conduct problems. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 19 (3). pp. 185-191. ISSN 1475-357X

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Identification Number: 10.1111/camh.12035

Abstract

Background: Interventions aimed at high-need families have difficulty demonstrating short-term impact on child behaviour. Measuring impact on use of services could provide short-term indication of longer term benefits. Method: During a feasibility pilot study we collected data on service use and attitudes to services from a small sample of parents from high-need families, before and after receiving the Helping Families Programme. Results: Respondents provided a range of opinions on a variety of social and community services received. Conclusions: The study demonstrates the potential of short-term changes in enhanced service use data for building hypotheses of longer term change.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28...
Additional Information: © 2013 The Authors © 2013 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2013 16:12
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2021 00:18
Funders: Department for Education, National Institute for Health Research
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/52401

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