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The effects of efficacy perceptions and poverty attributions on public support for development aid

Boese, Gregory and Macdonald, Bobbie (2013) The effects of efficacy perceptions and poverty attributions on public support for development aid. In: LSE Research Festival 2013: Exploring Research Stories Through Visual Images, 01 March 2013, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Levels of public support for development aid have been a perennial concern for development practitioners, policy-makers, and advocates of development aid more generally. Public opinion research has tracked individual attitudes towards development aid for decades; however, very little scholarly attention has been devoted to rigorously understanding the determinants of these attitudes. In this study, we empirically model how a range of psychological variables (e.g. political ideology, perceptions of aid efficacy, attributions of the causes of poverty) interact with one another to predict individual support for development aid. Specifically, we use path analysis on a cross-sectional dataset of individual characteristics, perceptions, and attitudes towards development aid collected from a sample of 180 Canadian university students. Our results provide a clear model for understanding the main determinants of public support for development aid and how these determinants interact with one another.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Additional Information: © 2013 The Authors
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Sets: Departments > International Development
Collections > LSE Research Festival 2013
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2013 12:39
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2013 08:57
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/49210

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