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The sun in the sky: the relationship between Pakistan's ISI and Afghan insurgents

Waldman, Matt (2010) The sun in the sky: the relationship between Pakistan's ISI and Afghan insurgents. Crisis States working papers series no.2, no. 18. Crisis States Research Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

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Abstract

Many accounts of the Afghan conflict misapprehend the nature of the relationship between Pakistan’s security services and the insurgency. The relationship, in fact, goes far beyond contact and coexistence, with some assistance provided by elements within, or linked to, Pakistan's intelligence service (ISI) or military. Although the Taliban has a strong endogenous impetus, according to Taliban commanders the ISI orchestrates, sustains and strongly influences the movement. They say it gives sanctuary to both Taliban and Haqqani groups, and provides huge support in terms of training, funding, munitions, and supplies. In their words, this is 'as clear as the sun in the sky'. Directly or indirectly the ISI appears to exert significant influence on the strategic decision-making and field operations of the Taliban; and has even greater sway over Haqqani insurgents. According to both Taliban and Haqqani commanders, it controls the most violent insurgent units, some of which appear to be based in Pakistan. Insurgent commanders confirmed that the ISI are even represented, as participants or observers, on the Taliban supreme leadership council, known as the Quetta Shura, and the Haqqani command council. Indeed, the agency appears to have circumscribed the Taliban's strategic autonomy, precluding steps towards talks with the Afghan government through recent arrests. Pakistan's apparent involvement in a double-game of this scale could have major geo-political implications and could even provoke US counter-measures. However, the powerful role of the ISI, and parts of the Pakistani military, suggests that progress against the Afghan insurgency, or towards political engagement, requires their support. The only sure way to secure such cooperation is to address the fundamental causes of Pakistan's insecurity, especially its latent and enduring conflict with India.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Official URL: http://www.crisisstates.com/index.htm
Additional Information: © 2010 The author
Library of Congress subject classification: J Political Science > JQ Political institutions Asia
Sets: Research centres and groups > Crisis States Research Centre
Rights: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/usingTheLibrary/academicSupport/OA/depositYourResearch.aspx
Identification Number: no. 18
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2010 15:17
URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/28435/

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