Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Multiple modernities in civilizational perspective: an assessment of the Global Civilization(s) Initiative

Buzan, Barry and Zhang, Feng (2024) Multiple modernities in civilizational perspective: an assessment of the Global Civilization(s) Initiative. Chinese Journal of International Politics, 17 (1). 104 - 126. ISSN 1750-8916

[img] Text (Multiple Modernities in Civilizational Perspective An Assessment of the Global Civilization(s) Initiative) - Accepted Version
Repository staff only until 27 March 2026.

Download (515kB) | Request a copy

Identification Number: 10.1093/cjip/poae006

Abstract

This paper starts from the supposition that civilization is an important concept for thinking about world order, and one that is increasingly coming back into play in world politics. It opens with a close look at the Global Civilization Initiative (GCI): what does it say, what does it imply, about what is it silent, and what are its policy contexts? It offers the theory of Uneven and Combined Development (UCD) as a way of looking at multiple modernities in terms of civilizational pluralism. This is followed by a historical unfolding of UCD since the early 19th century, showing how it has generated both single and multiple modernities cast in civilizational terms. The penultimate section focuses on the risks and opportunities that a world order of civilizational pluralism would create specifically for China. The conclusions summarize the main points of argument, and set out a more detailed global vision of what the GCI might aim to achieve if played well.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/cjip
Additional Information: © 2024 The Author(s)
Divisions: International Relations
Subjects: J Political Science > JC Political theory
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2024 08:24
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2024 03:15
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/122619

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics