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Quality indicators in surgical oncology: systematic review of measures used to compare quality across hospitals

McLeod, Megan, Leung, Kari, Pramesh, C. S., Kingham, Peter, Mutebi, Miriam, Torode, Julie, Ilbawi, Andre, Chakowa, Jade, Sullivan, Richard and Aggarwal, Ajay (2024) Quality indicators in surgical oncology: systematic review of measures used to compare quality across hospitals. BJS open, 8 (2). ISSN 2474-9842

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Identification Number: 10.1093/bjsopen/zrae009

Abstract

Background: Measurement and reporting of quality indicators at the hospital level has been shown to improve outcomes and support patient choice. Although there are many studies validating individual quality indicators, there has been no systematic approach to understanding what quality indicators exist for surgical oncology and no standardization for their use. The aim of this study was to review quality indicators used to assess variation in quality in surgical oncology care across hospitals or regions. It also sought to describe the aims of these studies and what, if any, feedback was offered to the analysed groups. Methods: A literature search was performed to identify studies published between 1 January 2000 and 23 October 2023 that applied surgical quality indicators to detect variation in cancer care at the hospital or regional level. Results: A total of 89 studies assessed 91 unique quality indicators that fell into the following Donabedian domains: process indicators (58; 64%); outcome indicators (26; 29%); structure indicators (6; 7%); and structure and outcome indicators (1; 1%). Purposes of evaluating variation included: identifying outliers (43; 48%); comparing centres with a benchmark (14; 16%); and supplying evidence of practice variation (29; 33%). Only 23 studies (26%) reported providing the results of their analyses back to those supplying data. Conclusion: Comparisons of quality in surgical oncology within and among hospitals and regions have been undertaken in high-income countries. Quality indicators tended to be process measures and reporting focused on identifying outlying hospitals. Few studies offered feedback to data suppliers.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/bjsopen
Additional Information: © 2024 The Author(s)
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2024 13:39
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2024 03:15
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/122600

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