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Delayed medical care due to transportation barriers among adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

Acquah, Isaac, Hagan, Kobina, Valero-Elizondo, Javier, Javed, Zulqarnain, Butt, Sara Ayaz, Mahajan, Shiwani, Taha, Mohamad Badie, Hyder, Adnan A., Mossialos, Elias ORCID: 0000-0001-8664-9297, Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel and Nasir, Khurram (2022) Delayed medical care due to transportation barriers among adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. American Heart Journal, 245. pp. 60-69. ISSN 0002-8703

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Identification Number: 10.1016/j.ahj.2021.11.019

Abstract

Background: In patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), barriers related to transportation may impair access to care, with potential implications for prognosis. Although few studies have explored transportation barriers among patients with ASCVD, the correlates of delayed care due to transportation barriers have not been examined in this population. We aimed to examine this in U.S. patients with ASCVD using nationally representative data. Methods: Using data from the 2009-2018 National Health Interview Survey, we estimated the self-reported prevalence of delayed medical care due to transportation barriers among adults with ASCVD, overall and by sociodemographic characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between various sociodemographic characteristics and delayed care due to transportation barriers. Results: Among adults with ASCVD, 4.5% (95% CI; 4.2, 4.8) or ∼876,000 annually reported delayed care due to transportation barriers. Income (low-income: odds ratio [OR] 4.43, 95% CI [3.04, 6.46]; lowest-income: OR 6.35, 95% CI [4.36, 9.23]) and Medicaid insurance (OR 4.53; 95% CI [3.27, 6.29]) were strongly associated with delayed care due to transportation barriers. Additionally, younger individuals, women, non-Hispanic Black adults, and those from the U.S. South or Midwest, had higher odds of reporting delayed care due to transportation barriers. Conclusions: Approximately 5% of adults with ASCVD experience delayed care due to transportation barriers. Vulnerable groups include young adults, women, low-income people, and those with public/no insurance. Future studies should analyze the feasibility and potential benefits of interventions such as use of telehealth, mobile clinics, and provision of transportation among patients with ASCVD in the U.S.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: : © 2021 Elsevier Inc.
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2023 16:00
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2024 22:12
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/121035

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