Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Sex differences among children, adolescents and young adults for mental health service use within inpatient and outpatient settings, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada

Moin, John S, Vigod, Simone N, Plumptre, Lesley, Troke, Natalie, Asaria, Miqdad ORCID: 0000-0002-3538-4417, Papanicolas, Irene ORCID: 0000-0002-8000-3185, Wodchis, Walter P., Brail, Shauna and Anderson, Geoff (2023) Sex differences among children, adolescents and young adults for mental health service use within inpatient and outpatient settings, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada. BMJ Open, 13 (11). ISSN 2044-6055

[img] Text (Moin_et_al__Sex-differences-young-people-mental-health-service-use-with-supp-material--published) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (874kB)
[img] Text (Moin_et_al__Sex-differences-young-people-mental-health-service-use--published) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (603kB)

Identification Number: 10.1136/bmjopen-2023-073616

Abstract

Objectives The pandemic and public health response to contain the virus had impacts on many aspects of young people’s lives including disruptions to daily routines, opportunities for social, academic, recreational engagement and early employment. Consequently, children, adolescents and young adults may have experienced mental health challenges that required use of mental health services. This study compared rates of use for inpatient and outpatient mental health services during the pandemic to pre-pandemic rates. Design Population-based repeated cross-sectional study. Setting Publicly delivered mental healthcare in primary and secondary settings within the province of Ontario, Canada. Participants All children 6–12 years of age (n=2 043 977), adolescents 13–17 years (n=1 708 754) and young adults 18–24 years (n=2 286 544), living in Ontario and eligible for provincial health insurance between March 2016 and November 2021. Primary outcome measures Outpatient mental health visits to family physicians and psychiatrists for: mood and anxiety disorders, alcohol and substance abuse disorders, other non-psychotic mental health disorders and social problems. Inpatient mental health visits to emergency departments and hospitalisations for: substance-related and addictive disorders, anxiety disorders, assault-related injuries, deliberate self-harm and eating disorders. All outcomes were analysed by cohort and sex. Results During the pandemic, observed outpatient visit rates were higher among young adults by 19.01% (95% CI: 15.56% to 22.37%; 209 vs 175 per 1000) and adolescent women 24.17% (95% CI: 18.93% to 29.15%; 131 vs 105 per 1000) for mood and anxiety disorders and remained higher than expected. Female adolescents had higher than expected usage of inpatient care for deliberate self-harm, eating disorders and assault-related injuries. Conclusions Study results raise concerns over prolonged high rates of mental health use during the pandemic, particularly in female adolescents and young women, and highlights the need to better monitor and identify mental health outcomes associated with COVID-19 containment measures and to develop policies to address these concerns.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Additional Information: © 2023 Author(s) (or their employer(s))
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2023 12:48
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2024 16:24
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/120798

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics