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Burnout, compassion satisfaction, and intention to quit among long-term care nursing assistants in the time of COVID-19

Richert, Mallory and Zucchero, Renee (2023) Burnout, compassion satisfaction, and intention to quit among long-term care nursing assistants in the time of COVID-19. Journal of Long-Term Care. pp. 73-82. ISSN 2516-9122

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Identification Number: 10.31389/jltc.160

Abstract

Context: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly exacerbated the stress and burden of those employed in long-term care (LTC) facilities due to staff shortages, increased risks on the job, and ever-changing COVID-19 protocol requirements. Objective: This study examines potential differences in pre-COVID-19 and current COVID-19 on burnout, compassion satisfaction, job satisfaction, and intent to quit of nursing assistants employed in LTC facilities. Methods: The sample included 81 nursing assistants employed in LTC facilities across the United States, with data collected prior to (n = 42) and during COVID-19 related shutdowns (n = 39). Participants completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale 5 (ProQOL 5), a single-item self-report measure of job satisfaction, and a two-item selfreport measure of intent to quit their current employment. Findings: Nursing assistants during COVID-19 reported a higher level of burnout and lower level of compassion satisfaction than nursing assistants pre-COVID-19. However, there were no differences in job satisfaction or intent to quit. Limitations: The study did not measure levels of burnout and compassion satisfaction throughout the entire pandemic. No causal statements can be made regarding the impact of the pandemic on nursing assistant burnout, compassion satisfaction, job satisfaction, or intention to quit. Implications: The results suggest there may be additional factors that influence an individual’s decision to remain employed above and beyond the impacts of burnout and compassion satisfaction that may be unique to the caring professions. Future research might investigate factors that influence an individual’s decision to remain employed as a nursing assistant during periods of increased stress and burnout.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2023 The Author(s)
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2023 09:48
Last Modified: 08 Jul 2024 00:30
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/119436

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