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Standing up for Myself (STORM): Adapting and piloting a web-delivered psychosocial group intervention for people with intellectual disabilities

Scior, Katrina, Richardson, Lisa, Osborne, Michaela, Randell, Elizabeth, Roche, Harry, Ali, Afia, Bonin, Eva M. ORCID: 0000-0001-9123-9217, Burke, Christine, Crabtree, Jason, Davies, Karuna, Gillespie, David, Jahoda, Andrew, Johnson, Sean, Hastings, Richard P., McNamara, Rachel and Wright, Melissa (2023) Standing up for Myself (STORM): Adapting and piloting a web-delivered psychosocial group intervention for people with intellectual disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 137. ISSN 0891-4222

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Identification Number: 10.1016/j.ridd.2023.104496

Abstract

Background: Our STORM intervention was developed for people (16 +) with intellectual disabilities to enhance their capacity to manage and resist stigma. The current study describes the adaptation of STORM for (synchronous) on-line delivery in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic. Aims: To adapt the manualised face-to-face STORM group intervention for delivery via web-based meeting platforms and to conduct an initial pilot study to consider its acceptability and feasibility. Methods and procedures: The 5-session STORM intervention was carefully adapted for online delivery. In a pilot study with four community groups (N = 22), outcome, health economics and attendance data were collected, and fidelity of delivery assessed. Focus groups with participants, and interviews with facilitators provided data on acceptability and feasibility. Outcomes and results: The intervention was adapted with minimal changes to the content required. In the pilot study, 95% of participants were retained at follow-up, 91% attended at least three of the five sessions. Outcome measure completion and fidelity were excellent, and facilitators reported implementation to be feasible. The intervention was reported to be acceptable by participants. Conclusions and implications: When provided with the necessary resources and support, people with intellectual disabilities participate actively in web-delivered group interventions.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2023 The Author(s).
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences
Date Deposited: 04 May 2023 09:33
Last Modified: 26 May 2024 04:48
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/118789

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