Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Understanding predictors of mental health and substance use treatment utilization among US adults: a repeated cross-sectional study

Dhinsa, Jaskiran, Roman-Urrestarazu, Andres, van Kessel, Robin and Humphreys, Keith (2023) Understanding predictors of mental health and substance use treatment utilization among US adults: a repeated cross-sectional study. Global Epidemiology, 5. ISSN 2590-1133

[img] Text (Understanding predictors of mental health and substance use treatment utilization among US adults) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (2MB)

Identification Number: 10.1016/j.gloepi.2023.100109

Abstract

Background: Understanding discrepancies in mental health and substance use treatment utilization can help identify inequities in access to health services. We investigate mental health and substance use treatment utilization as function of demographic and social determinants, as well as pre-existing mental health and substance use disorders. Methods: In this repeated cross-sectional study, we used the 2017–2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data on US adults above age 18. Two logistic regression models were conducted, using predictors of age, gender, race/Hispanicity, sexual identity, education, insurance, family income, and past year mental health and substance use disorders, with outcomes of mental health or substance use treatment utilization. Weighted estimates of substance use disorders and insurance types and Pearson's correlation tests of vulnerability among age, gender, and treatment type were reported. Findings: Racial minorities, uninsured populations, sexual minorities, and females had lower odds of receiving mental health treatment, while older populations, lower income groups, and dual eligible enrollees had higher odds. Individuals with substance use disorders but no mental illness had higher odds of receiving mental health treatment. Those utilizing mental health treatment were mostly of high income, privately insured, and using cannabis, cocaine, and opioids. Older populations, men, and Medicaid only enrollees had higher odds of receiving substance use disorder treatment, whereas racial minorities had lower odds. Distribution of income, insurance type, and substance use were more widespread than mental health treatment. Interpretation: Mental health treatment can be used as an avenue for substance use treatment, particularly opioid use disorders. It is important to target vulnerable populations, like racial minorities and uninsured populations to improve access to mental health and substance use treatment.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2023 The Author(s).
Divisions: LSE Health
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Date Deposited: 03 May 2023 13:15
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2024 07:51
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/118779

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics