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Household wealth, neighbourhood deprivation and frailty amongst middle-aged and older adults in England: a longitudinal analysis over 15 years (2002-2017)

Maharani, Asri, Sinclair, David R., Chandola, Tarani, Bower, Peter, Clegg, Andrew, Hanratty, Barbara, Nazroo, James, Pendleton, Neil, Tampubolon, Gindo, Todd, Chris, Wittenberg, Raphael ORCID: 0000-0003-3096-2721, O'Neill, Terence W. and Matthews, Fiona E. (2023) Household wealth, neighbourhood deprivation and frailty amongst middle-aged and older adults in England: a longitudinal analysis over 15 years (2002-2017). Age and ageing, 52 (3). ISSN 0002-0729

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Identification Number: 10.1093/ageing/afad034

Abstract

BACKGROUND: frailty is a condition of reduced function and health due to ageing processes and is associated with a higher risk of falls, hospitalisation, disability and mortality. OBJECTIVE: to determine the relationship between household wealth and neighbourhood deprivation with frailty status, independently of demographic factors, educational attainment and health behaviours. DESIGN: population-based cohort study. SETTING: communities in England. SUBJECTS: in total 17,438 adults aged 50+ from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. METHODS: multilevel mixed-effects ordered logistic regression was used in this study. Frailty was measured using a frailty index. We defined small geographic areas (neighbourhoods) using English Lower layer Super Output Areas. Neighbourhood deprivation was measured by the English Index of Multiple Deprivation, grouped into quintiles. Health behaviours included in this study are smoking and frequency of alcohol consumption. RESULTS: the proportion of respondents who were prefrail and frail were 33.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 33.0-34.6%] and 11.7 (11.1-12.2)%, respectively. Participants in the lowest wealth quintile and living in the most deprived neighbourhood quintile had 1.3 (95% CI = 1.2-1.3) and 2.2 (95% CI = 2.1-2.4) times higher odds of being prefrail and frail, respectively, than the wealthiest participants living in the least deprived neighbourhoods Living in more deprived neighbourhood and poorer wealth was associated with an increased risk of becoming frail. Those inequalities did not change over time. CONCLUSIONS: in this population-based sample, living in a deprived area or having low wealth was associated with frailty in middle-aged and older adults. This relationship was independent of the effects of individual demographic characteristics and health behaviours.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/ageing
Additional Information: © 2023 The Authors
Divisions: Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
JEL classification: D - Microeconomics > D1 - Household Behavior and Family Economics > D10 - General
I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I3 - Welfare and Poverty > I31 - General Welfare; Basic Needs; Living Standards; Quality of Life; Happiness
Date Deposited: 18 Apr 2023 14:18
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2023 23:27
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/118661

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