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From protests into pandemic: demographic change in Hong Kong, 2019–2021

Gietel-basten, Stuart and Chen, Shuang ORCID: 0000-0003-0645-0507 (2023) From protests into pandemic: demographic change in Hong Kong, 2019–2021. Asian Population Studies, 19 (2). 184 - 203. ISSN 1744-1730

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Identification Number: 10.1080/17441730.2023.2193082

Abstract

Compared to other settings, COVID-19 infection and death rates in Hong Kong were very low until 2022, due to top-down interventions (e.g. quarantines, ‘mask mandates’) and community activation. However, in addition to these epidemiological circumstances, Hong Kong has also undergone significant social and political change stemming from the social movement beginning in 2019 through the enacting, and aftermath, of the National Security Law. We draw on registered birth and marriage data from 2015 through 2021 to explore how fertility and nuptiality changed after the social movement followed by the first four waves of the COVID pandemic. We describe how fertility and marriage rates have changed in Hong Kong and to what extent the changes are associated with the social movement and the COVID pandemic. We further disaggregate the fertility and nuptiality trends by Hong Kong-born and non-Hong Kong-born population, with a specific focus on migrants from the Mainland.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/raps20
Additional Information: © 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2023 13:06
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2024 00:30
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/118543

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