Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Why the US spends more treating high-need high-cost patients: a comparative study of pricing and utilization of care in six high-income countries

Lorenzoni, Luca, Marino, Alberto, Or, Zeynep, Blankart, Carl Rudolf, Shatrov, Kosta, Wodchis, Walter, Janlov, Nils, Figueroa, Jose F., Bowden, Nicholas, Bernal-Delgado, Enrique and Papanicolas, Irene ORCID: 0000-0002-8000-3185 (2023) Why the US spends more treating high-need high-cost patients: a comparative study of pricing and utilization of care in six high-income countries. Health Policy, 128. 55 - 61. ISSN 0168-8510

[img] Text (Marino_why-the-us-spends-more-treating--published) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)

Identification Number: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2022.12.004

Abstract

One of the most pressing challenges facing most health care systems is rising costs. As the population ages and the demand for health care services grows, there is a growing need to understand the drivers of these costs across systems. This paper attempts to address this gap by examining utilization and spending of the course of a year for two specific high-need high-cost patient types: a frail older person with a hip fracture and an older person with congestive heart failure and diabetes. Data on utilization and expenditure is collected across five health care settings (hospital, post-acute rehabilitation, primary care, outpatient specialty and drugs), in six countries (Canada (Ontario), France, Germany, Spain (Aragon), Sweden and the United States (fee for service Medicare) and used to construct treatment episode Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) that compare prices using baskets of goods from the different care settings. The treatment episode PPPs suggest other countries have more similar volumes of care to the US as compared to other standardization approaches, suggesting that US prices account for more of the differential in US health care expenditures. The US also differs with regards to the share of expenditures across care settings, with post-acute rehab and outpatient speciality expenditures accounting for a larger share of the total relative to comparators.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/health-polic...
Additional Information: © 2022 The Author(s).
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2023 14:54
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2024 17:30
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/117773

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics