Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Belief in sexism shift: defining a new form of contemporary sexism and introducing the belief in sexism shift scale (BSS scale)

Zehnter, Miriam K., Manzi, Francesca ORCID: 0000-0002-6074-4680, Shrout, Patrick E. and Heilman, Madeline E. (2021) Belief in sexism shift: defining a new form of contemporary sexism and introducing the belief in sexism shift scale (BSS scale). PLOS ONE, 16 (3). ISSN 1932-6203

[img] Text (journal.pone.0248374) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)

Identification Number: 10.1371/journal.pone.0248374

Abstract

The belief that the target of sexism has shifted from women to men is gaining popularity. Yet despite its potential theoretical and practical importance, the belief that men are now the primary target of sexism has not been systematically defined nor has it been reliably measured. In this paper, we define the belief in sexism shift (BSS) and introduce a scale to measure it. We contend that BSS constitutes a new form of contemporary sexism characterized by the perception that anti-male discrimination is pervasive, that it now exceeds anti-female discrimination, and that it is caused by women’s societal advancement. In four studies (N = 666), we develop and test a concise, one-dimensional, 15-item measure of BSS: the BSS scale. Our findings demonstrate that BSS is related to, yet distinct from other forms of sexism (traditional, modern, and ambivalent sexism). Moreover, our results show that the BSS scale is a stable and reliable measure of BSS across different samples, time, and participant gender. The BSS scale is also less susceptible to social desirability concerns than other sexism measures. In sum, the BSS scale can be a valuable tool to help understand a new and potentially growing type of sexism that may hinder women in unprecedented ways.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/
Additional Information: © 2021 The Author(s).
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2022 13:42
Last Modified: 24 May 2024 16:03
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/116955

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics