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Exploring the effectiveness of demand-side retail pharmaceutical expenditure reforms: cross-country evidence from weighted-average least squares estimation

Berger, Michael, Pock, Markus, Reiss, Miriam, Röhrling, Gerald and Czypionka, Thomas (2022) Exploring the effectiveness of demand-side retail pharmaceutical expenditure reforms: cross-country evidence from weighted-average least squares estimation. International journal of Health Economics and Management. ISSN 2199-9023

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Identification Number: 10.1007/s10754-022-09337-6

Abstract

Increasing expenditures on retail pharmaceuticals bring a critical challenge to the financial stability of healthcare systems worldwide. Policy makers have reacted by introducing a range of measures to control the growth of public pharmaceutical expenditure (PPE). Using panel data on European and non-European OECD member countries from 1990 to 2015, we evaluate the effectiveness of six types of demand-side expenditure control measures including physician-level behaviour measures, system-level price-control measures and substitution measures, alongside a proxy for cost-sharing and add a new dimension to the existing empirical evidence hitherto based on national-level and meta-studies. We use the weighted-average least squares regression framework adapted for estimation with panel-corrected standard errors. Our empirical analysis suggests that direct patient cost-sharing and some—but not all—demand-side measures successfully dampened PPE growth in the past. Cost-sharing schemes stand out as a powerful mechanism to curb PPE growth, but bear a high risk of adverse effects. Other demand-side measures are more limited in effect, though may be more equitable. Due to limitations inherent in the study approach and the data, the results are only explorative.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2022, The Author(s).
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine
H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
JEL classification: I - Health, Education, and Welfare > I1 - Health > I18 - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2022 09:30
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2022 09:30
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/116928

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