Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Inclusive recovery planning for incremental systemic change: a methodology, early outcomes, and limitations from the Falkland Islands' Covid-19 recovery planning experience

Cochrane, Kate, Cornish, Flora ORCID: 0000-0002-3404-9385, Murphy, Annette, Denton, Neil and Bracken, Louise (2022) Inclusive recovery planning for incremental systemic change: a methodology, early outcomes, and limitations from the Falkland Islands' Covid-19 recovery planning experience. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management. ISSN 0966-0879

[img] Text (Cornish_inclusive-recovery-planning--published) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (578kB)

Identification Number: 10.1111/1468-5973.12428

Abstract

Crises do not affect populations equally but expose and exacerbate long-standing vulnerabilities and inequalities. Recovery language such as "build back better", or "bounce forward" has been criticised for neglecting underlying inequalities. This paper reports on the process and early outcomes of an inclusive Community Recovery Planning process for the Falkland Islands, in response to Covid-19. The Falkland Islands is home to a complex community, with close ties and short power distances (due to its small size and remoteness), with differences institutionalised in citizenship statuses and entitlements, and shaped by geopolitical tensions. We aimed to use the "pandemic as a portal", seeking out previously "less heard" voices, to make visible previously hidden impacts, and initiate incremental systemic change to tackle them. Community Impact Assessments evidenced specific areas of vulnerability (e.g. housing and income insecurity) and inequalities, largely shaped by differing citizenship status. In tandem with other government currents, the Community Recovery Planning process has contributed to progressive policy changes in Equalities legislation and Income Support. We offer this paper as a demonstration of our methodology for inclusive recovery planning that could be adapted elsewhere. We argue that the inclusion of previously unheard voices contributed to incremental systemic change to reduce inequalities.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14685973
Additional Information: © 2022 The Authors
Divisions: Methodology
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2022 11:51
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2022 08:18
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/115524

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics