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When law-and-order politics fail: media fragmentation and protective factors that limit the politics of fear

Lee, Murray, Ellis, Justin R., Keel, Chloe, Wickes, Rebecca and Jackson, Jonathan ORCID: 0000-0003-2426-2219 (2022) When law-and-order politics fail: media fragmentation and protective factors that limit the politics of fear. British Journal of Criminology, 62 (5). 1270 – 1288. ISSN 0007-0955

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Identification Number: 10.1093/bjc/azac038

Abstract

Law-and-order politics has long been a topic of scholarly work. The leveraging of fear of crime for political capital has been of particular concern. In the 2018 election in the Australian state of Victoria, crime and law-and-order became prominent political issues, particularly through racialized discourse about ‘African gangs'. That election provides a case study here. This article turns the traditional analysis of the politics of fear of crime around and considers some of the key reasons why law-and-order politics failed to gain decisive political traction in this instance. Media fragmentation and diversification continues to challenge the primacy of political primary definers in unpredictable ways. As such, electoral strategies that seek to leverage fear of crime and community insecurity need to be understood in the context of broader individual, community, and social protective factors that might mitigate fear of crime.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/bjc
Additional Information: © 2022 The Authors
Divisions: Methodology
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2022 11:48
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2024 00:51
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/114578

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