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The problems and intersectional politics of "#BeingFemaleinNigeria"

Dosekun, Simi (2022) The problems and intersectional politics of "#BeingFemaleinNigeria". Feminist Media Studies. ISSN 1468-0777

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Identification Number: 10.1080/14680777.2022.2030386

Abstract

In June 2015, Nigerian women on Twitter convened around the hashtag “#BeingFemaleinNigeria” (#BFIN) to represent their experiences, observations, and critiques of patriarchal oppression in Nigeria. This article parses the content and internal politics of #BFIN as a Nigerian feminist hashtag campaign. Given that there is no singular Nigerian female experience, and that experience is not unmediated, the article asks: as represented by participants in the #BFIN campaign, what are the issues involved in being a woman in Nigeria, and for whom exactly, for Nigerian women occupying what kinds of discursive-material subject positions? Based on a thematic and intersectional analysis of 700 #BFIN tweets, I argue that the predominant representations are of the voice, experiences, and concerns of a type of subject that I call “the empowered Nigerian woman,” an educated, capacious, and confident urban career woman belonging to the country’s higher socio-economic strata. The campaign made urgently important claims about mundane sexist attitudes and practices that impede this type of Nigerian woman. However, marked by a lack of intersectional consciousness, the predominant story of the campaign was unrepresentative of the problems and experiences of the vast majority of Nigerian women.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/rfms20
Additional Information: © 2022 The Author
Divisions: Media and Communications
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2022 16:42
Last Modified: 10 May 2022 18:03
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/113535

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