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Trends and characteristics of hospitalisations from the harmful use of opioids in England between 2008 and 2018: population-based retrospective cohort study

Friebel, Rocco ORCID: 0000-0003-1256-9096 and Maynou-Pujolras, Laia ORCID: 0000-0002-0447-2959 (2022) Trends and characteristics of hospitalisations from the harmful use of opioids in England between 2008 and 2018: population-based retrospective cohort study. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 115 (5). 173 - 185. ISSN 0141-0768

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Identification Number: 10.1177/01410768221077360

Abstract

Objective To examine the trends and characteristics of opioid-related hospital admissions in England over 10 years, and its burden for the National Health Service and public finances. Design Patient-level data from the Hospital Episode Statistics database to examine all opioid-related hospitalisations from 2008 to 2018, stratified by type of opioid admission and patient demographics. Setting All National Health Service hospitals in England. Participants Patients hospitalised from the harmful use of opioids. Main outcome measures The number of opioid-related hospitalisations, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission rate and treatment costs. Results Opioid-related hospitalisations increased by 48.9%, from 10,805 admissions in 2008 to 16,091 admissions in 2018, with total treatment costs of £137 million. The growth in opioid-related hospitalisations was 21% above the corresponding rate for all other emergency admissions in England. Relative changes showed that hospitalisations increased most for individuals older than 55 years (160%), those living in the most affluent areas of England (93.8%), and suffering from four co-morbidities (627.6%) or more. Hospitals reduced mean patient length of stay from 2.8 days to 1.1 days over 10 years. Mean in-hospital mortality was 0.4% and mean 30-day readmission risk was 16.6%. Conclusion Opioid use is an increasing public health concern in England, though hospitalisation and mortality rates are less pronounced than in other countries. There are concerns about significant rises in hospitalisations from older, less deprived and sicker population groups. Our findings should prompt policymakers to go beyond monitoring mortality statistics when assessing the impacts of harmful use of opioids.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/jrs
Additional Information: © 2022 The Authors
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2022 15:06
Last Modified: 12 May 2022 09:33
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/113466

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