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Can the ‘learn in peace, educate without violence’ intervention in Cote d’Ivoire reduce teacher violence? Development of a theory of change and formative evaluation results

Devries, Karen, Balliet, Manuela, Thornhill, Kerrie, Knight, Louise, Procureur, Fanny, N’djoré, Yah Ariane Bernadette, N’guessan, Dedou Gruzshca Ferrand, Merrill, Katherine G, Dally, Mustapha, Allen, Elizabeth, Hossain, Mazeda, Cislaghi, Beniamino, Tanton, Clare and Quintero, Lucia (2021) Can the ‘learn in peace, educate without violence’ intervention in Cote d’Ivoire reduce teacher violence? Development of a theory of change and formative evaluation results. BMJ Open, 11 (11). e044645. ISSN 2044-6055

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Identification Number: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-044645

Abstract

Objectives To gather evidence on whether a brief intervention (Apprendre en paix et éduquer sans violence, developed by the Ivorian Ministry of Education and Graines de Paix) to promote peace in primary schools by reducing teacher violence perpetration and improving pedagogical techniques was acceptable to teachers and affected change in intermediate outcomes. Design Mixed-methods formative research. Setting Primary schools in Tonkpi region, Cote d'Ivoire. Participants 160 teachers participating in the peace training, surveyed three times during implementation; qualitative in-depth interviews with 19 teachers and teacher-counsellors. Interventions Learn in peace, educate without violence-a brief intervention with primary school teachers designed to promote peace in primary schools. Outcomes For survey data, we generated composite measures of intermediate outcomes (teachers' awareness of consequences of violence, self-efficacy in applying positive classroom management methods, acceptance of physical discipline practices in school) and used random intercept linear mixed-effects models to compare responses over time. Qualitative research included open-ended questions about acceptability and perceived need for such an intervention. A framework analysis was undertaken. Results Four-months post-training (vs pretraining), teachers had higher self-efficacy in applying positive classroom management methods (pre-mean=26.1; post-mean=27.5; p<0.001) and borderline lower acceptance of physical discipline practices (premean=4.2; postmean=3.6; p=0.10). We found no change in teacher awareness of the consequences of violence. Qualitatively, teachers found the intervention acceptable and understandable, perceiving it as useful because it provided methods for non-violent discipline. Teachers had mixed views about whether the techniques improved classroom dynamics. Conclusions Data suggest that the intervention is acceptable and leads to change in intermediate outcomes for teachers. Further evaluation in a randomised controlled trial is warranted.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors
Divisions: IGA: Centre for Women Peace and Security
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
J Political Science > JQ Political institutions Asia
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2021 13:15
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2021 16:27
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/112726

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