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Discourse on behavioural science in times of COVID-19: the two distinct and divisive perceptions that exist in the media and among the public

Sanders, Jet, Tosi, Alessia, Obradović, Sandra ORCID: 0000-0001-7930-3909, Miligi, Ilaria and Delaney, Liam (2021) Discourse on behavioural science in times of COVID-19: the two distinct and divisive perceptions that exist in the media and among the public. British Politics and Policy at LSE (01 Jul 2021). Blog Entry.

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Abstract

Drawing on mixed-methods research, Jet Sanders, Alessia Tosi, Sandra Obradovic, Ilaria Miligi and Liam Delaney found behavioural science to be a divisive topic in UK newspaper articles and on Twitter. They reviewed newspaper and social media discourses on behavioural science in the UK’s COVID-19 response, with a view to identify the role of transparency and trust in science actors in this high-stake context. Based on their findings, they recommend that greater efforts are made to clarify both the function of a behavioural scientist in a policy context and the diversity of approaches taken toward behavioural science to avoid media divisiveness in future emergencies.

Item Type: Online resource (Blog Entry)
Official URL: https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors
Divisions: LSE
Psychological and Behavioural Science
Subjects: J Political Science > JN Political institutions (Europe) > JN101 Great Britain
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date Deposited: 16 Sep 2021 15:00
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2021 15:00
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/111753

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