Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Sin taxes and their effect on consumption, revenue generation and health improvement: a systematic literature review in Latin America

Miracolo, Aurelio, Sophiea, Marisa, Mills, Mackenzie and Kanavos, Panos ORCID: 0000-0001-9518-3089 (2021) Sin taxes and their effect on consumption, revenue generation and health improvement: a systematic literature review in Latin America. Health Policy and Planning, 36 (5). 790 - 810. ISSN 0268-1080

[img] Text (czaa168) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (612kB)

Identification Number: 10.1093/heapol/czaa168

Abstract

Sin or public health taxes are excise taxes imposed on the consumption of potentially harmful goods for health [sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), tobacco, alcohol, among others], aiming to reduce consumption, raise additional revenue and/or improve population health. This paper assesses the extent to which sin taxes (a) can reduce consumption of potentially harmful goods, (b) raise revenue for national health systems and (c) contribute to population health in Latin America. A systematic literature review was conducted on peer-reviewed and grey literature; endpoints included: impact of raising sin taxes on consumption, ability to raise revenue for health and the possibility of population health improvements. Risk of bias for each study was assessed. The synthesis of the literature on sin tax implementation showed improvements in all three endpoints across the study countries. Following the introduction of sin taxes or by simulating their potential impact, nearly all studies explicitly reported that consumption of potentially harmful goods (mainly SSBs and tobacco) declined; revenue was found to have increased in almost all countries, suggesting that there may be additional scope for further tax increase. Simulated improvements in population health have also been shown, by demonstrating a relationship between sin tax increases and reduction in prevalence of diabetes, stroke, heart attacks and associated deaths. However, sin tax effects on health would be better quantified over the long-term. Data quality and availability challenges did place some limitations on sin tax impact assessment. Sin taxes can be effective in reducing consumption of potentially harmful goods, improve population health and generate additional revenue. Promoting further research on this topic should be a priority.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/heapol
Additional Information: © 2020 The Authors
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Date Deposited: 28 May 2021 13:45
Last Modified: 20 Sep 2021 04:13
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/110727

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics