Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

An inherited animus to communal land: the mechanisms of coloniality in land reform agendas in Acholiland, northern Uganda

Hopwood, Julian (2021) An inherited animus to communal land: the mechanisms of coloniality in land reform agendas in Acholiland, northern Uganda. Critical African Studies. ISSN 2168-1392

[img] Text (Hopwood_an-inherited-animus-to-communal-land--published) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (574kB)
Identification Number: 10.1080/21681392.2021.1931383

Abstract

Access to land for the Acholi people of northern Uganda still has much in common with understandings of the pre-colonial situation. This paper reflects on how collective landholding has faced over a century of hostile policy promoting land as private property. The notion of coloniality arises in this confrontation: the failure of communication ensuing from understanding Acholi social ordering in terms of false entities; and the foregrounding of land as object. The durability of colonial mechanisms emerges in processes such as the codification of the principles and practices of Acholi ‘customary land’. Pressure for land reform is driven by external bodies, UN agencies, donor governments and international NGOs, claiming to be seeking to protect the interest of the poor. Yet these offer no respite for the growing numbers of landless people - the colonial agenda appears to have its own momentum, serving no one’s interests. Meanwhile misunderstandings and misrepresentations of land holding groups entrenches the subaltern voicelessness of their members, isolating them from any support in dealing with the challenges of too many people on not enough land.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcaf20/current
Additional Information: © 2021 The Authors
Divisions: Firoz Lalji Institute for Africa
Subjects: J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
Date Deposited: 19 May 2021 10:24
Last Modified: 20 Sep 2021 04:13
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/110502

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics