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Modeling cultural change: computational models of interpersonal influence dynamics can yield new insights about how cultures change, which cultures change more rapidly than others, and why

Schaller, Mark and Muthukrishna, Michael ORCID: 0000-0002-7079-5166 (2021) Modeling cultural change: computational models of interpersonal influence dynamics can yield new insights about how cultures change, which cultures change more rapidly than others, and why. American Psychologist, 76 (6). 1027 - 1038. ISSN 0003-066X

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Identification Number: 10.1037/amp0000797

Abstract

Cultural change can occur as an emergent consequence of social influence dynamics within cultural populations. These influence dynamics are complex, and formal modeling methods—such as agent-based models—are a useful means of predicting implications for cultural change. These models may be especially useful if they not only model the psychological outcomes of interpersonal influence, but also model social network structures within a culture. When combined, these components provide a flexible modeling framework that allows other variables to also be modeled for the purposes of predicting plausible implications for cultural change. The article illustrates this approach by summarizing recent research that employed these methods to model cross-cultural differences in the pace of cultural change. The article then identifies additional variables that could potentially be modeled within this conceptual framework, in order to produce additional insights—and additional new hypotheses—about different circumstances associated with different patterns of cultural change.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://psycnet.apa.org/PsycARTICLES/journal/amp/7...
Additional Information: © 2021 American Psychological Association
Divisions: Psychological and Behavioural Science
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2020 12:21
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2022 00:08
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/107607

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