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There is no ideal place, but it is best to deliver in a hospital: expectations and experiences of health facility-based childbirth in Imo state, Nigeria

Gwacham-Anisiobi, Uchenna Chinenye and Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi ORCID: 0000-0002-4449-0131 (2020) There is no ideal place, but it is best to deliver in a hospital: expectations and experiences of health facility-based childbirth in Imo state, Nigeria. Pan African Medical Journal, 36. pp. 1-14. ISSN 1937-8688

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Identification Number: 10.11604/pamj.2020.36.317.22728

Abstract

Introduction: annually, about 67,000 of the 196,000 maternal deaths in sub-Saharan Africa occur in Nigeria, second only to India. Though health facility childbirths have been linked with improved health outcomes, evidence suggests that experiences of care influence future use. This study explored the expectations and experiences of health facility childbirths for mothers in Imo State, Nigeria. Methods: this qualitative study utilised in-depth interviews with 22 purposively sampled mothers who delivered in different types (private and public) and levels (primary, secondary, tertiary) of health facilities in Imo State. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed following Braun and Clarke´s six-stage thematic analysis. Results: four key themes emerged from the analysis. Generally, women saw value in facility-based delivery. However, they had varying expectations for seeking care with different care providers. For those who sought care from public hospitals, the availability of “experts” was a key driver. While those who used private facilities went there because of their perceived empathy and dignity. However, while experiences of disrespect, abuse and health worker expectation for them to cooperate were reported in both public and private facilities, long waiting times, unconducive environments, and lack of privacy were experienced in public facilities. Conclusion: every woman deserves a positive experience of childbirth. To achieve this, mothers´ perceptions of different providers need to be heard. Going forward, strategies ensuring that both public and private sector providers can guarantee holistic care for every woman will be key to realising the maternal mortality target of the Sustainable Development Goal 3.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/
Additional Information: © 2020 The Authors
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RG Gynecology and obstetrics
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2020 00:36
Last Modified: 20 Sep 2021 02:19
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/107513

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