Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Response: overcoming the barriers to longer tenancies in the private rented sector

Newman, Rhea (2018) Response: overcoming the barriers to longer tenancies in the private rented sector. . Shelter, London, UK.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Shelter strongly welcomes the government’s proposals to introduce three-year tenancies for private renters. Everyone should have access to a secure home where they can put down roots and a threeyear tenancy would be a significant step towards giving private renters the security they need. However, this change will only be meaningful if it is backed up by a change in the law, so that landlords have to offer longer tenancies to all renters. Anything less than a change in the law, which allows landlords to choose who they offer longer tenancies to, risks creating a two-tier market where some renters are given greater security and others are not. Landlords will only offer longer tenancies to those who they perceive to be the least risky and therefore with any voluntary system, there is a risk that renters who would most benefit from a longer tenancy will miss out. The introduction of mandatory three-year tenancies would significantly improve the experience of private renters. Knowing they have the right to stay in their home for at least three years would give renters greater security, reducing anxiety about suddenly being asked to move and making it easier to complain, without fear of a retaliatory eviction. However, whilst three-years is a significant improvement on the current situation, ultimately renters should have the right to stay in their home for as long as they want to, and nobody should ever be evicted without a good reason. Therefore, as part of developing proposals for a new longer tenancy framework, we encourage the government to look closely at what is happening in Scotland to assess the benefits of permanent tenancies

Item Type: Monograph (Report)
Additional Information: © 2018 Shelter
Divisions: LSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
J Political Science > JS Local government Municipal government
Date Deposited: 07 Aug 2020 14:30
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2020 00:49
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/106111

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item