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Everyday strategies for handling food safety concerns: a qualitative study of distrust, contradictions, and helplessness among Taiwanese women

Chiu, Yu Chan and Yu, Ssu Han (2019) Everyday strategies for handling food safety concerns: a qualitative study of distrust, contradictions, and helplessness among Taiwanese women. Health, Risk and Society, 21 (7-8). 319 - 334. ISSN 1369-8575

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Identification Number: 10.1080/13698575.2019.1685658

Abstract

Past research has provided evidence of the important role that trust plays in people’s decisions regarding food consumption. This study examines the reasons for people’s distrust in food production systems and how they conceptualise and handle food-related risks in everyday life in a context in which food scandals have occurred frequently. In-depth interviews were conducted with 39 married Taiwanese women. Our findings indicated that the women believed that collusion commonly occurs between business and government entities and that such collusion frequently leads to food scandals. However, despite their distrust in the food system and suspicion towards the government, the women generally still relied on food labels and certifications when making food purchasing decisions. These ‘in-between’ strategies were formed by their knowledge and experiences of day-to-day living in Taiwan, and while the strategies may seem somewhat self-contradictory, they can be understood as empowering people to protect themselves and their families in circumstances of general distrust and helplessness.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/chrs20/current
Additional Information: © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
Divisions: Media and Communications
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics
J Political Science > JF Political institutions (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2020 08:12
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2020 08:12
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/105209

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