Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Gender issues in the context of a humanitarian crisis

Hardi, Choman (2019) Gender issues in the context of a humanitarian crisis. LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security Working Paper Series (21/2019). Centre for Women Peace and Security, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

[img] Text (Hardi_Gender issues-humanitarian-crisis--published) - Published Version
Download (4MB)

Abstract

The United Nations’ Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda aims to achieve gender equality through increasing women’s participation in peacebuilding and conflict prevention.1 It also aims to protect vulnerable individuals who are forcibly displaced by violent conflict.2 In reality, despite overlaps, the interests of these groups may compete for attention. The main concern of this paper is the marginalisation of some women’s interests in the context of a humanitarian crisis. It outlines the findings of a research study on the effects of an emergency on the efforts of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working to advance gender equality in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The paper focuses on the funding priorities of regional and international agencies in the context of the Islamic State (IS) crisis and the consequences for women’s rights organisations. IS cruelty in Syria and Iraq prompted the forced displacement of thousands of civilians. In Iraq, the majority of refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs) settled in Kurdistan. In the post-2013 era, funds were directed to support the displaced communities, to cope with the humanitarian crisis, and to meet the urgent needs of those affected. National NGOs adjusted their mandates, and local women’s issues consequently took a back seat.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Official URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/publicat...
Additional Information: © 2019 The Author
Divisions: IGA: Centre for Women Peace and Security
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
Date Deposited: 13 May 2020 13:54
Last Modified: 27 May 2020 23:42
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/104050

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics