Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

What is electoral psychology? - Scope, concepts, and methodological challenges for studying conscious and subconscious patterns of electoral behavior, experience, and ergonomics

Harrison, Sarah (2020) What is electoral psychology? - Scope, concepts, and methodological challenges for studying conscious and subconscious patterns of electoral behavior, experience, and ergonomics. Societies, 10 (1). ISSN 2075-4698

[img] Text (What is electoral psychology?) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (238kB)

Identification Number: 10.3390/soc10010020

Abstract

Electoral psychology is defined as any model based on human psychology that is used to explain any electoral experience or outcome at the individual or aggregate level. Electoral psychology can also be an interface with other crucial aspects of the vote. For example, the interface between electoral psychology and electoral organization constitutes electoral ergonomics. The very nature of the models tested in electoral psychology has also led scholars in the field to complement mainstream social science methodologies with their own specific methodological approaches in order to capture the subconscious component of the vote and the subtle nature of the psychological processes determining the electoral experience and the way in which it permeates citizens’ thoughts and lives. After defining electoral psychology, this introductory article scopes its analytical roots and contemporary relevance, focuses on the importance of switching from “institution-centric” to “people-centric” conceptions of electoral behavior, and notably how it redefines key concepts such as electoral identity and consistency, and approaches questions of personality, morality, memory, identity, and emotions in electoral psychological models. Then, it discusses some of the unique methodological challenges that the field faces, notably when it comes to analyzing largely subconscious phenomena, and addresses them, before explaining how the various contributions to this Special Issue give a flavor of the scope and approaches of electoral psychology contributions to electoral studies.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/societies
Additional Information: © 2020 The Author
Divisions: Government
Subjects: J Political Science > JF Political institutions (General)
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2020 12:36
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2020 23:25
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/103543

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics