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Reducing mommy penalties with daddy quotas

Dunatchik, Allison and Özcan, Berkay (2019) Reducing mommy penalties with daddy quotas. CASEpapers (213). Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

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Abstract

This paper investigates whether daddy quotas - non-transferable paternity leave policies - mitigate motherhood penalties women face in the labor market. Using the introduction of a daddy quota in Quebec, Canada as a natural experiment, the authors employ labor force survey data to conduct a difference-in-difference estimation of the policy’s impact on a range of mothers’ career outcomes. The results suggest Quebec mothers exposed to the policy are 5 percentage points more likely to participate in the labor force and to work full-time, 5 percentage points less likely to work part-time, and 4 percentage points less likely to be unemployed. These results are robust to an alternative semiparametric difference-in-difference methodology and to a battery of placebo and sensitivity tests. However, the authors find that the policy’s effects are largest two to three years post-reform, reducing in size and significance thereafter, raising questions about the durability of such effects.

Item Type: Monograph (Working Paper)
Official URL: https://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/CASE/_new/publications/C...
Additional Information: © 2019 The Authors
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
JEL classification: J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J1 - Demographic Economics > J16 - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
J - Labor and Demographic Economics > J1 - Demographic Economics > J18 - Public Policy
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2020 10:42
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2020 23:08
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/103461

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