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Electoral ergonomics: three empirical examples of the interface between electoral psychology and design

Bruter, Michael (2019) Electoral ergonomics: three empirical examples of the interface between electoral psychology and design. Societies, 9 (4). ISSN 2075-4698

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Identification Number: 10.3390/soc9040082

Abstract

Electoral ergonomics pertains to the interface between electoral psychology and electoral design. It moves beyond traditional models of electoral organisation that often focus on mechanical effects or changes to who actually votes to investigate the ways in which different forms of electoral organisation will switch on and off various electoral psychology buttons (in terms of personality, memory, emotions and identity) so that the very same person’s electoral experience, thinking process, and ultimately electoral behaviour will change based on the design of electoral processes. This article illustrated this phenomenon based on two case studies, one which showed that young people seemed more likely to vote for radical right parties if they voted postally than in person at the polling station based on panel study evidence from the UK, and another which showed that the time citizens deliberate about their vote varied from 1 to 3 depending on whether they were asked to vote using materialised or dematerialised mono-papers or poly-paper ballots. The article suggested that electoral ergonomics, as the interface between electoral psychology and election design, exceeded the sum of its parts.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/societies
Additional Information: © 2019 The Author
Divisions: Government
Subjects: J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2020 13:57
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2020 23:18
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/102997

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