Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Voter information campaigns and political accountability: cumulative findings from a preregistered meta-analysis of coordinated trials

Dunning, Thad, Grossman, Guy, Humphreys, Macartan, Hyde, Susan D., McIntosh, Craig, Nellis, Gareth, Adida, Claire, Arias, Eric, Bicalho, Clara, Boas, Taylor C, Buntaine, Mark T, Chauchard, Simon, Chowdhury, Anirvan, Gottlieb, Jessica, Hidalgo, F Daniel, Holmlund, Marcus, Jablonski, Ryan S., Kramon, Eric, Larreguy, Horacio, Lierl, Malte, Marshall, John, McClendon, Gwyneth, Melo, Marcus, Nielson, Daniel L., Pickering, Paula M., Platas, Melina R, Querubin, Pablo and Sircar, Neelanjan (2019) Voter information campaigns and political accountability: cumulative findings from a preregistered meta-analysis of coordinated trials. Science Advances. ISSN 2375-2548 (In Press)

[img] Text (Voter Information) - Accepted Version
Pending embargo until 1 January 2100.

Download (6MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Voters often know little about the performance of politicians. To remedy such informational deficits, civil society groups and international donors advocate using voter information campaigns to improve democratic accountability. Such interventions build on core assumptions of many theoretical models in political science. Yet, are these campaigns effective? Limited replication, measurement heterogeneity, and publication biases may undermine the generalizability and reliability of bodies of published research. We implemented a novel approach to cumulative learning, coordinating on the design of seven randomized controlled trials to be fielded in six countries by independent research teams. Uncommonly for multi-site trials in the social sciences, we jointly pre-registered a meta-analysis of results in advance of seeing the data. We find no evidence overall that typical, non-partisan voter information campaigns shape voter behavior, though exploratory and sub-group analyses suggest conditions under which informational campaigns could be more effective. Such null estimated effects are too seldom published, yet they can be critical for scientific progress and cumulative, policy-relevant learning.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Government
Date Deposited: 15 May 2019 12:27
Last Modified: 14 Aug 2019 23:15
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100814

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics