Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Shelter from the storm: Somali migrant networks in Uganda between international business and regional geopolitics

Iazzolino, Gianluca and Hersi, Mohamed (2019) Shelter from the storm: Somali migrant networks in Uganda between international business and regional geopolitics. Journal of Eastern African Studies, 13 (3). pp. 371-388. ISSN 1753-1055

[img] Text (Shelter from the storm Somali migrant networks in Uganda between international business and regional geopolitics) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB)
Identification Number: 10.1080/17531055.2019.1575513

Abstract

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the Somali population in Uganda. This spike reflects a new development in the history of Somali mobility in East Africa, shaped both by crises and by opportunities, from which sophisticated transnational and translocal strategies have emerged. In this article, we draw attention to these strategies to understand continuity and change in Somali migrant networks in Kampala, highlighting the dual significance of Uganda both as a safe haven and as a stepping stone for upward social mobility and business expansion across the region and beyond. By describing the entanglement of needs and aspirations driving the mobility and livelihood strategies of Somali refugees, students and entrepreneurs, we argue that the historical trajectory of the Somali community in Uganda over the past 30 years has been shaped by the interaction of pre-existing linkages and an institutional framework defined by a mix of donor-oriented policies and presidential patronage. We identify three moments in which Museveni’s ability to ‘manage donors’ perceptions’ has had implications for the economic, demographic and political configuration of the Somali diaspora in Uganda: the economic liberalisation of the 1990s; the 2006 Refugee Act; and the 2007 deployment of UPDF in Uganda.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 The Authors
Divisions: International Development
Subjects: J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2019 15:39
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2019 23:08
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100200

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics