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Sodium nitrite–mediated cardioprotection in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Jones, Daniel A., Whittaker, Peter, Rathod, Krishnaraj S., Richards, Amy J., Andiapen, Mervyn, Antoniou, Sotiris, Mathur, Anthony and Ahluwalia, Amrita (2019) Sodium nitrite–mediated cardioprotection in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: a cost-effectiveness analysis. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 24 (2). pp. 113-119. ISSN 1074-2484

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Identification Number: 10.1177/1074248418784940

Abstract

Objectives: In the follow-up of patients in a trial of intracoronary sodium nitrite given during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we found a reduction in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). Specifically, MACE rates were 5.2% versus 25.0% with placebo at 3 years (P =.013). Such MACE reductions should also be associated with economic benefit. Thus, we assessed the cost utility of sodium nitrite therapy versus standard primary PCI only. Methods and Results: We developed a model to simulate costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) over the first 36 months after ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). Decision tree analysis was used to assess different potential cardiovascular outcomes after STEMI for patients in both treatment groups. Model inputs were derived from the NITRITE-AMI study. Cost of comparative treatments and follow-up in relation to cardiovascular events was calculated from the United Kingdom National Health Service perspective. Higher procedural costs for nitrite treatment were offset by lower costs for repeat revascularization, myocardial infarction, and hospitalization for heart failure compared to primary PCI plus placebo. Nitrite treatment was associated with higher utility values (0.91 ± 0.19 vs 0.82 ± 0.30, P =.041). The calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £2177 per QALY indicates a cost-effective strategy. Furthermore, positive results were maintained when input parameters varied, indicating the robustness of our model. In fact, based on the difference in utility values, the cost of nitrite could increase by 4-fold (£2006 per vial) and remain cost-effective. Conclusion: This first analysis of sodium nitrite as a cardioprotective treatment demonstrates cost-effectiveness. Although more comparative analysis and assessment of longer follow-up times are required, our data indicate the considerable potential of nitrite-mediated cardioprotection.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2018 The Authors
Divisions: Health Policy
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2019 11:33
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2019 00:12
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100157

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