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The global economics of European populism: growth regimes and party system change in Europe (The Government and Opposition/Leonard Schapiro Lecture 2017)

Hopkin, Jonathan and Blyth, Mark (2018) The global economics of European populism: growth regimes and party system change in Europe (The Government and Opposition/Leonard Schapiro Lecture 2017). Government and Opposition. 1–33. ISSN 1477-7053

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Identification Number: 10.1017/gov.2018.43

Abstract

The expanding literature on growth regimes has recently been applied to explain the growth of populist movements across the OECD. Such applications posit a stand-off between debtors and creditors as the core conflict that generates populism. While insightful, the theory has problems explaining why, in some European countries, such movements pre-date both the global financial crisis and the austerity measures that followed, factors that are commonly seen as causing the rise of populism. This article takes a different tack. It derives shifts in both political parties and party systems from the growth regime framework. In doing so it seeks to explain the evolution of the cartel form of party that dominated the political systems of Europe from the late 1990s through to the current period and why that form proved unable to respond meaningfully to both the financial crisis and the political crisis that followed it.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Government and Opposition Limited and Cambridge University Press
Divisions: Government
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
J Political Science > JN Political institutions (Europe)
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2019 14:36
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2019 03:25
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/100094

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