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"Leunig, Tim"

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Number of items: 78.

Article

Stanfors, Maria, Leunig, Tim, Eriksson, Björn and Karlsson, Tobias (2014) Gender, productivity, and the nature of work and pay: evidence from the late nineteenth-century tobacco industry. Economic History Review, 67 (1). pp. 48-65. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim (2013) Understanding the English economy 1381–1869: editor's introduction. Explorations in Economic History, 50 (1). pp. 1-3. ISSN 0014-4983

Leunig, Tim (2012) The Liberal Democrats and supply-side economics. Economic Affairs, 32 (2). pp. 17-20. ISSN 0265-0665

Leunig, Tim (2011) Measuring economic performance and social progress. European Review of Economic History, 15 (2). pp. 357-363. ISSN 1361-4916

Leunig, Tim, Minns, Chris and Wallis, Patrick (2011) Networks in the premodern economy: the market for London apprenticeships, 1600-1749. Journal of Economic History, 71 (2). pp. 413-443. ISSN 0022-0507

Crafts, Nicholas, Leunig, Tim and Mulatu, Abay (2011) Corrigendum: were British railway companies well managed in the early twentieth century? Economic History Review, 64 (1). pp. 351-356. ISSN 0013-0117

Leunig, Tim (2010) Social savings. Journal of Economic Surveys, 24 (5). pp. 775-800. ISSN 0950-0804

Humphries, Jane and Leunig, Tim (2009) Cities, market integration and going to sea: stunting and the standard of living in early nineteenth century England and Wales. Economic History Review, 62 (2). pp. 458-478. ISSN 0013-0117

Humphries, Jane and Leunig, Timothy (2009) Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London? Explorations in Economic History, 46 (1). pp. 120-131. ISSN 0014-4983

Crafts, Nicholas, Leunig, Tim and Mulatu, Abay (2008) Were British railway companies well-managed in early twentieth century? Economic History Review, 61 (4). pp. 842-866. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim and Overman, Henry G. (2008) Spatial patterns of development and the British housing market. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 24 (1). pp. 59-78. ISSN 0266-903X

Leunig, Tim (2006) Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways. Journal of Economic History, 66 (3). pp. 635-673. ISSN 1471-6372

Leunig, Tim and Voth, Hans-Joachim (2006) Comment on Oxley’s "Seat of death and terror". Economic History Review, 59 (3). pp. 607-616. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim (2004) Turning NIMBYs into IMBYs. Town and Country Planning, 73 (12). pp. 357-359. ISSN 0040-9960

Leunig, Tim (2003) A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago. Economic History Review, 56 (1). pp. 90-117. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim (2001) New answers to old questions : explaining the slow adoption of ring spinning in Lancashire, 1880-1913. Journal of Economic History, 61 (2). 439 -466. ISSN 1471-6372

Leunig, Tim and Voth, Hans-Joachim (2001) Smallpox really did reduce height : a reply to Razzell. Economic History Review, 54 (1). pp. 110-114. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim (1998) The myth of the corporate economy: factor costs, industrial structure and technological choice in the Lancashire and New England cotton textile industries, 1900-1913. The Journal of Economic History, 58 (2). pp. 528-531. ISSN 0022-0507

Leunig, Tim and Voth, Hans-Joachim (1998) Smallpox did reduce height : a reply to our critics. Economic History Review, 51 (2). pp. 372-381. ISSN 1468-0289

Voth, Hans-Joachim and Leunig, Tim (1996) Did smallpox reduce height?: stature and the standard of living in London, 1770-1873. Economic History Review, 49 (3). pp. 541-560. ISSN 1468-0289

Leunig, Tim (1996) The myth of the corporate economy: Great Britain's cotton textile industry, 1900 - 1913. Business and Economic History, 25 (2). pp. 53-67. ISSN 0849-6825

Book Section

Leunig, Timothy (2010) Post-Second World War British railways: the unintended consequences of insufficient government intervention. In: Margetts, Helen, 6, Perri and Hood, Christopher, (eds.) Paradoxes of Modernization: Unintended Consequences of Public Policy Reform. Oxford University Press, New York, USA, pp. 155-184. ISBN 9780199573547

Leunig, Tim (2010) Post-world war II British railways: the unintended consequences of insufficient government intervention. In: Margetts, Helen, 6, Perri and Hood, Christopher, (eds.) Paradoxes of Modernization: Unintended Consequences of Public Policy Reform. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. ISBN 9780199573547

Leunig, Tim, Marrison, Andrew and Broadberry, Stephen (2009) Selling English cotton into the world market: implications for the rationalisation debate 1900 - 1939. In: Wilson, John F., (ed.) King Cotton: a Tribute to Douglas A. Farnie. Carnegie Publishing Ltd., Lancaster, UK, pp. 39-58. ISBN 9781905472093

Leunig, Tim and Voth, Hans-Joachim (2006) Height and the high life: what future for a tall story? In: David, Paul A. and Thomas, Mark, (eds.) The Economic Future in Historical Perspective. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, pp. 419-438. ISBN 9780197263471

Leunig, Tim (2003) Cotton industry: technological change. In: Mokyr, Joel, (ed.) The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 24-29. ISBN 0195105079

Leunig, Tim and Voth, Hans-Joachim (2001) Height and the high life – what future for a tall story? In: David, Paul A. and Thomas, Mark, (eds.) The Economic Future in Historical Perspective. British Academy centenary monographs. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, pp. 419-438. ISBN 0197262376.

Monograph

Crafts, Nicholas, Leunig, Tim and Mulatu, Abay (2010) Were British railway companies well-managed in the early twentieth century? Economic History Working Papers, 137/10. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Crafts, Nicholas, Leunig, Tim and Mulatu, Abay (2007) Were British railway companies well-managed in the early twentieth century? Working papers in large-scale technological change, 10/07. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Humphries, Jane and Leunig, Tim (2007) Was Dick Whittington taller than those he left behind?: anthropometric measures, migration and the quality of life in early nineteenth century London. Economic History Working Papers, 101/07. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Leunig, Tim (2005) Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways. Working papers in large-scale technological change, 09/05. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Leunig, Tim (2003) Piece rates and learning: understanding work and production in the New England textile industry a century ago. Economic History Working Papers, 72/03. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Leunig, Tim (2002) Can profitable arbitrage opportunities in the raw cotton market explain Britain’s continued preference for mule spinning? Economic History Working Papers, 69/02. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Leunig, Tim (2001) Britannia ruled the waves. Economic History Working Papers, 66/01. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Leunig, Tim (2000) New answers to old questions: explaining the slow adoption of ring spinning in Lancashire, 1880-1913. Economic History Working Papers, 60/00. Department of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.

Website

Leunig, Tim (2012) How to cut the cost of railways and keep fares down. British Politics and Policy at LSE (20 Aug 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) David Cameron’s housing benefit proposal is nothing but a gimmick. Building more houses is a better way to cut the housing benefit bill. British Politics and Policy at LSE (26 Jun 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) The TaxPayers’ Alliance and Institute of Directors have just produced a new report on the British Tax System. Some parts are good, some are plain silly. British Politics and Policy at LSE (21 May 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) Water companies should incentivise businesses to use less water and charge households that use high amounts more per unit. British Politics and Policy at LSE (19 Apr 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) This was a Tory budget from a Tory Chancellor. British Politics and Policy at LSE (21 Mar 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) With the budget on the horizon, the government should take the opportunity to create a fairer and more equal tax system for pensioners. British Politics and Policy at LSE (05 Mar 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) Elsevier have a right to price their journals as they see fit, but they must be honest in their reasoning and not attack boycotters with untruths. Impact of Social Sciences Blog (22 Feb 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) With one in seven shops now lying empty, high street retail must go where the money is in order to survive. British Politics and Policy at LSE (08 Feb 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) The proposed benefit cap for those out of work means that government expects people to live on 62p per day. British Politics and Policy at LSE (23 Jan 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) Political pressure may encourage ‘responsible capitalism’ in the short term. But more competition and higher educational standards are needed in the long term. British Politics and Policy at LSE (20 Jan 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) It’s official: waivers and bursaries don’t attract students. British Politics and Policy at LSE (13 Jan 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) More than 1 in 3 Welsh graduates leave Wales to work. The importance of universities is massively increased if graduates stay in the area. British Politics and Policy at LSE (09 Jan 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2012) Without a rise in German wages, 2012 may see the beginning of the breakup of the Eurozone. British Politics and Policy at LSE (03 Jan 2012) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) History tells us that we can get out of the current economic slump if government guarantees low interest rates, rising prices, and provides a more sensible planning system. British Politics and Policy at LSE (28 Dec 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Without a greater focus on education, the government’s strategy of transferring more power to cities may struggle to deliver growth. British Politics and Policy at LSE (09 Dec 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The right to strike is an important one, but the public and private sectors should be treated equally: government should ensure that when unions ballot members simultaneously, ballots are counted separately by employers. British Politics and Policy at LSE (30 Nov 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) National Insurance is complex and pointless and should be merged with income tax. British Politics and Policy at LSE (10 Nov 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) We need to invest much more in our schools. A better educated Britain is better for employers and for improving social mobility. British Politics and Policy at LSE (26 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) George Osborne's Comprehensive Spending Review has yielded few surprises. British Politics and Policy at LSE (22 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Beckett, Charlie, Cammaerts, Bart, Carrera, Leandro N. and Leunig, Tim (2011) All change in the UK’s welfare state?: first thoughts on what policy commitments should go, and which should not. British Politics and Policy at LSE (18 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) We need hundreds of thousands of new homes in Britain. But in its present form, the government’s proposed new planning framework is not likely to deliver them. British Politics and Policy at LSE (18 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Ball, Michael, Barker, Kate, Cheshire, Paul, Evans, Alan, Fernández Arrigoitia, Melissa, Gordon, Ian, Holman, Nancy, Leunig, Tim, Mace, Alan, Meen, Geoff, Monk, Sarah, Overman, Henry G., Power, Anne, Scanlon, Kathleen, Rode, Philipp, Tonkiss, Fran, Travers, Tony and Whitehead, Christine M E (2011) The government’s planned National Planning Policy Framework is a step in the right direction, but policy makers must ensure they get the incentives right, and that decisions are made locally. British Politics and Policy at LSE (17 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) While Cameron’s vision is seriously constrained by the economy, his government’s advantage is that the alternative is still tainted by the past. British Politics and Policy at LSE (10 Oct 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Labour’s proposed tuition fees cap does not change the fact that most graduates will never earn enough to repay their loans. British Politics and Policy at LSE (28 Sep 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) When planning for new housing developments, we must make sure they are built where people actually want to live. British Politics and Policy at LSE (18 Aug 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The rise in global gas prices is being passed on disproportionately to the poor by utility companies. British Politics and Policy at LSE (17 Aug 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Conditional discharges for looters that come forward would be a first step towards community reconciliation in the wake of the recent riots. British Politics and Policy at LSE (15 Aug 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Poor pupil performance is more about poverty than school quality. We must ensure our schools work for poor children in all places. British Politics and Policy at LSE (03 Aug 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Growth figures show that Britain is essentially going backwards. Bringing forward the £10,000 tax allowance is the best option to encourage growth. British Politics and Policy at LSE (26 Jul 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The Office of Fair Access has failed: university fees have been allowed to rise too high and are disproportionate to graduate incomes. British Politics and Policy at LSE (15 Jul 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The News International phone-hacking saga threatens to retoxify the Tory brand. Cameron needs to be ruthless to save his reputation. British Politics and Policy at LSE (11 Jul 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The Higher Education White Paper is a good start at introducing real competition between universities for academic places. British Politics and Policy at LSE (28 Jun 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Abolishing quotas for students with high A level grades will not drive down university fees. British Politics and Policy at LSE (22 Jun 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) The government’s proposed cap on benefits is based upon a questionable grasp of how the benefits system actually works, and would exacerbate difficulties for poor, out of work families. British Politics and Policy at LSE (16 Jun 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Budget 2011: The new flat rate pension will reduce poverty among the retired, but employers who offer good pensions may be penalised financially as a result. British Politics and Policy at LSE (28 Mar 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Budget 2011: Fiscally neutral, and some ‘radical’ planning changes, but the devil is definitely in the detail. British Politics and Policy at LSE (23 Mar 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Housing is expensive in Britain. This is because we have built too few houses for the number of new households – land auctions will help give us the homes we need. British Politics and Policy at LSE (23 Mar 2011) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2011) Only competitive tension will keep student fees down – it is time to quit the quotas. British Politics and Policy at LSE (02 Mar 2011) Blog Entry.

Hills, John, Wehner, Joachim, Dunleavy, Patrick, Cammaerts, Bart and Leunig, Tim (2010) The ‘emergency’ budget – solving the UK’s problems?: or creating the basis for new crises? British Politics and Policy at LSE (25 Jun 2010) Blog Entry.

Bouçek, Françoise, Jones, George W., Wilks-Heeg, Stuart, Travers, Tony, Beckett, Charlie, Hosein, Gus, Carrera, Leandro N. and Leunig, Tim (2010) LSE election experts reflect on the election result. British Politics and Policy at LSE (09 May 2010) Blog Entry.

Jones, George W., Bouçek, Francoise, Hagemann, Sara, Leunig, Tim and Carrera, Leandro N. (2010) Eve of the election: reflections from election experts. British Politics and Policy at LSE (06 May 2010) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2010) Third debate – economic affairs: what our experts said. British Politics and Policy at LSE (30 Apr 2010) Blog Entry.

Leunig, Tim (2010) Hard choices in UK public policy – railways. British Politics and Policy at LSE (18 Mar 2010) Blog Entry.

This list was generated on Sun Oct 26 03:22:17 2014 GMT.