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Group politics in the debates on gender equality and sexual orientation discrimination at the United Nations

Smith, Karen E. (2017) Group politics in the debates on gender equality and sexual orientation discrimination at the United Nations. Hague Journal of Diplomacy, 12 (2-3). pp. 138-157. ISSN 1871-1901

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Identification Number: 10.1163/1871191X-12341362

Abstract

The article assesses the impact of ‘group politics’ in the particularly contentious debates in the UN’s Human Rights Council and the UN General Assembly regarding gender equality and discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The article identifies those groups that have been most active in the debates, and then analyses how and why they have shaped debates and norms in this area, how they interact with each other, and whether groups help facilitate consensus or foster polarisation in debates. The article examines the extent to which those groups are cohesive, and identifies the norms that each group puts forward in debates (through statements and resolutions). It then assesses and explains their impact on outcomes, the creation of shared norms, and the potential for collective action. It further explores the implications of increasing cross-regional group activity in the Human Rights Council.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.brill.com/hague-journal-diplomacy
Additional Information: © 2017 Brill
Divisions: International Relations
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
J Political Science > JF Political institutions (General)
J Political Science > JX International law
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Sets: Departments > International Relations
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2016 11:21
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2019 12:45
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/67071

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