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Doubly disadvantaged? Bullying experiences among disabled children and young people in England

Chatzitheochari, Stella and Parsons, Samantha and Platt, Lucinda (2016) Doubly disadvantaged? Bullying experiences among disabled children and young people in England. Sociology, 50 (4). pp. 695-713. ISSN 0038-0385

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Identification Number: 10.1177/0038038515574813

Abstract

Bullying among school-aged children and adolescents is recognised as an important social problem, and the adverse consequences for victims are well established. However, despite growing interest in the socio-demographic profile of victims, there is limited evidence on the relationship between bullying victimisation and childhood disability. This article enhances our understanding of bullying experiences among disabled children in both early and later childhood, drawing on nationally representative longitudinal data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. We model the association of disability measured in two different ways with the probability of being bullied at ages seven and 15, controlling for a wide range of known risk factors that vary with childhood disability. Results reveal an independent association of disability with bullying victimisation, suggesting a potential pathway to cumulative disability-related disadvantage, and drawing attention to the school as a site of reproduction of social inequalities.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://soc.sagepub.com/
Additional Information: © 2015 The Authors © CC BY 3.0
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Date Deposited: 08 May 2015 09:29
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2016 11:09
Projects: ES/K00302X/1, ES/K00302X/1
Funders: Economic and Social Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/61876

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