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The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

Hirani, S. P. and Beynon, M. and Cartwright, M. and Rixon, L. and Doll, H. and Henderson, C. and Bardsley, M. and Steventon, A. and Knapp, M. and Rogers, A. and Bower, P. and Sanders, C. and Fitzpatrick, R. and Hendy, J. and Newman, S. P (2014) The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial. Age and Ageing, 43 (3). pp. 334-341. ISSN 0002-0729

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Identification Number: 10.1093/ageing/aft185

Abstract

: home-based telecare (TC) is utilised to manage risks of independent living and provide prompt emergency responses. This study examined the effect of TC on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depressive symptoms over 12 months in patients receiving social care. Design: a study of participant-reported outcomes [the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Telecare Questionnaire Study; baseline n = 1,189] was nested in a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial of TC (the WSD Telecare trial), held across three English Local Authorities. General practice (GP) was the unit of randomisation and TC was compared with usual care (UC). Methods: participant-reported outcome measures were collected at baseline, short-term (4 months) and long-term (12 months) follow-up, assessing generic HRQoL, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Primary intention-to-treat analyses tested treatment effectiveness and were conducted using multilevel models to control for GP clustering and covariates for participants who completed questionnaire measures at baseline assessment plus at least one other assessment (n = 873). Results: analyses found significant differences between TC and UC on Short Form-12 mental component scores (P < 0.05), with parameter estimates indicating being a member of the TC trial-arm increases mental component scores (UC-adjusted mean = 40.52; TC-adjusted mean = 43.69). Additional significant analyses revealed, time effects on EQ5D (decreasing over time) and depressive symptoms (increasing over time). Conclusions: TC potentially contributes to the amelioration in the decline in users’ mental HRQoL over a 12-month period. TC may not transform the lives of its users, but it may afford small relative benefits on some psychological and HRQOL outcomes relative to users who only receive UC.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Authors
Divisions: Social Policy
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > LSE Health and Social Care
Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Research centres and groups > NIHR School for Social Care Research
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2015 16:43
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2015 16:43
Funders: Policy Research Programme in the Department of Health
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/60927

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