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Maintenance cognitive stimulation therapy for dementia: single-blind, multicentre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial

Orrell, Martin and Aguirre, Elisa and Spector, Aimee and Hoare, Zoë and Woods, Robert T. and Streater, Amy and Donovan, Helen and Hoe, Juanita and Knapp, Martin and Whitaker, Christopher and Russell, Ian (2014) Maintenance cognitive stimulation therapy for dementia: single-blind, multicentre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 204 (6). pp. 454-461. ISSN 0007-1250

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Identification Number: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.137414

Abstract

Background:- There is good evidence for the benefits of short-term cognitive stimulation therapy for dementia but little is known about possible long-term effects. Aims:- To evaluate the effectiveness of maintenance cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) for people with dementia in a single-blind, pragmatic randomised controlled trial including a substudy with participants taking acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). Method:- The participants were 236 people with dementia from 9 care homes and 9 community services. Prior to randomisation all participants received the 7-week, 14-session CST programme. The intervention group received the weekly maintenance CST group programme for 24 weeks. The control group received usual care. Primary outcomes were cognition and quality of life (clinical trial registration: ISRCTN26286067). Results:- For the intervention group at the 6-month primary end-point there were significant benefits for self-rated quality of life (Quality of Life in Alzheimer’s Disease (QoL-AD) P = 0.03). At 3 months there were improvements for proxy-rated quality of life (QoL-AD P = 0.01, Dementia Quality of Life scale (DEMQOL) P = 0.03) and activities of daily living (P = 0.04). The intervention subgroup taking AChEIs showed cognitive benefits (on the Mini-Mental State Examination) at 3 (P = 0.03) and 6 months (P = 0.03). Conclusions:- Continuing CST improves quality of life; and improves cognition for those taking AChEIs.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
Additional Information: © 2014 The Royal College of Psychiatrists
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Research centres and groups > NIHR School for Social Care Research
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2014 17:08
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2017 14:26
Projects: Maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Programme (ISRCTN26286067), Support at Home - Interventions to Enhance Life in Dementia (SHIELD) project (Application No. RP-PG-0606-1083)
Funders: National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Programme Grants for Applied Research funding scheme (RP-PG-060-1083)
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/60469

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