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A grounded theory investigation into the philosophical and pedagogical theories of play by blind and visually impaired children

Hayhoe, Simon (2014) A grounded theory investigation into the philosophical and pedagogical theories of play by blind and visually impaired children. In: 6th Biennial Conference of the International Froebel Society entitled "Play, Self- activity, Representation and Development", 2014-06-26 - 2014-06-28.

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Abstract

This article presents a grounded theory investigation into the academic, social and cultural roots of the theory of play for cognitive and emotional development of blind and visually impaired children. Data is analysed through an epistemological model of disability, and through a notion of passive and active exclusion from cultural activities through institutional policy and practice. In common with the findings of a previous study on the development of theory and practice in art and museum education, it is argued that theories on the use of touch over other forms of perception were developed with negative consequences, and that theories were overly influenced by a form of reductionist philosophy of enlightenment from the 17th and 18th centuries. Furthermore, it is also argued that such philosophical and pedagogical theories were influenced by the cultural and religious predisposition of their authors. The pedagogical approaches that developed from the enlightenment philosophies, it is additionally argued, have done little to develop a full range of perceptual experiences during play, including visual stimuli of colour and tone, something that is particularly important for children with impaired vision. The study has two main conclusions. The first conclusion is that, in common with art and other forms of creative activity in education, access to multi-modal forms of play that encompass and utilize all of the senses in concert should be favoured for blind and visually impaired children – as indeed it should be for all children – and that the individual needs of the blind and visually impaired child should be considered when designing the environment and toys they use for play. The second conclusion is that research on creativity and play for children who are blind and visually impaired needs to be less influenced by the background of the author and reductionist philosophies, and instead should emphasise the individual physical, social and cultural needs of the blind and visually impaired child.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Official URL: http://www.intfroebelsoc.org/index.html
Additional Information: © 2014 The Author
Divisions: CPNSS
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education
Sets: Research centres and groups > Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS)
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2014 14:12
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2020 23:39
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/59354

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