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Doing it for themselves: an evaluation of peer approaches to drug prevention

Shiner, Michael (2000) Doing it for themselves: an evaluation of peer approaches to drug prevention. . Drugs Prevention Advisory Service, Great Britain Home Office, London, UK. ISBN 1840825138

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Abstract

The programs took place in three parts of the country and were part programs guided by the Drugs Prevention Advisory Service. Information came from interviews with 37 professionals, 69 peer educators, and 33 youths who took part in peer education sessions. A school-based survey gathered information from 651 youths who were ages 15-17 years and in year 11 and 12 of school. Results revealed that peer education is an umbrella term that covers a range of approaches. The projects studied highlighted important differences between schools and youth and community settings and indicated the importance of matching the approach, setting, and type of peer group. Results also indicated the need for planning and resources equal to those for other drug prevention programs. Findings also indicated that the informal and semiformal aspects of peer education are important and that peer education offers a useful mechanism for working with minorities. In addition, young people assess the credibility of drug educators on the basis of their personal characteristics, role, knowledge, experience, and approach and that youth regard knowledge and authentic experience as important. Findings also indicated the need to assess outcomes on the basis of realistic measures. The analysis concluded that peer education is not a panacea and needs development within a coordinated drug prevention strategy. Peer education projects also provide opportunities for multidisciplinary and interagency collaboration.

Item Type: Monograph (Report)
Additional Information: no experts page
Divisions: Social Policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2013 13:57
Last Modified: 29 May 2020 23:17
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/50892

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