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Economic outcomes in adulthood and their associations with antisocial conduct, attention deficit and anxiety problems in childhood

Knapp, Martin, King, Derek, Healey, Andrew and Thomas, Cicely (2011) Economic outcomes in adulthood and their associations with antisocial conduct, attention deficit and anxiety problems in childhood. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, 14 (3). pp. 137-147. ISSN 1091-4358

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Abstract

Mental health problems in childhood have negative effects on individuals and families for potentially many years. Using data from a British birth cohort study, we tested for links between behavioural and emotional problems in childhood, and occupational status and earnings in adulthood, adjusting for individual and family covariates. Among males, antisocial conduct at age 10 was associated with a higher probability unemployment at age 30, but higher earnings if employed, and higher expected earnings. Childhood attention deficit problems were associated with lower employment rates, worse jobs, lower earnings if employed, and lower expected earnings overall for both males and females. Childhood anxiety problems were associated with lower earnings in adulthood. Prevention, early detection and treatment of these mental health problems might head off many of these long-term negative consequences for children, their families and wider society. Background: Conduct disorder (antisocial conduct), attention deficit problems and anxiety in childhood have negative effects on individuals during their childhood, on their families, and often into adulthood. Aims of the Study: To quantify the connections between childhood antisocial conduct, attention deficit and anxiety, and some adulthood economic consequences. Methods: Data from a British birth cohort study were examined for links between behavioural and emotional problems in childhood, and occupational status and earnings in adulthood, after adjusting for individual and family covariates. Results: The effects of antisocial conduct on adult labour market outcomes were complex. Results for males with antisocial conduct at age 10 showed a higher probability of being unemployed at age 30 (after adjustment for other factors). However, males with antisocial conduct at age 10 had higher earnings than those without such behaviour, again after adjusting for other factors. There were no such differences for females with antisocial conduct. Attention deficit problems at age 10 were associated with lower employment rates, worse jobs, lower earnings if employed, and lower expected earnings overall - for both males and females. Anxiety problems were associated with lower earnings. Other childhood factors associated with worse adulthood economic outcomes included cognitive attainment, living in a disadvantaged neighbourhood, mother's educational qualifications, family income and being looked after by a local authority. Discussion: Links between antisocial conduct and attention deficit in childhood and high adulthood personal and societal costs support arguments for effective interventions to prevent and treat behavioural problems in childhood. However, the cost-effectiveness of such interventions still needs to be considered carefully. Implications for Policy: Childhood mental health problems are strongly linked to adverse adulthood experiences across a number of domains. Early detection and intervention might head off many of these negative outcomes for children, their families and wider society. The positive impact of antisocial conduct on earnings needs further examination: it is not necessarily counter-intuitive, but it raises interesting policy questions. Implications for Further Research: The long-term outcomes of childhood problems and interventions need further study, as do the pathways connecting childhood morbidity, adulthood outcomes and other potential intervening factors.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://www.icmpe.org/test1/journal/journal.htm
Additional Information: © 2011 International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics
Library of Congress subject classification: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Rights: http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/usingTheLibrary/academicSupport/OA/depositYourResearch.aspx
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2011 14:11
URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/38200/

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