Cookies?
Library Header Image
LSE Research Online LSE Library Services

Cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression in primary care: randomised controlled trial

McCrone, Paul, Knapp, Martin ORCID: 0000-0003-1427-0215, Proudfoot, Judith, Ryden, Clash, Cavanagh, Kate, Shapiro, David A., Ilson, Sophie, Gray, Jeffrey A., Goldberg, David, Mann, Anthony, Marks, Isaac, Everitt, Brian and Tylee, Andre (2004) Cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression in primary care: randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 185 (1). pp. 55-62. ISSN 0007-1250

Full text not available from this repository.

Identification Number: 10.1192/bjp.185.1.55

Abstract

Background: Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective for treating anxiety and depression in primary care, but there is a shortage of therapists. Computer-delivered treatment may be a viable alternative. Aims: To assess the cost-effectiveness of computer-delivered CBT. Method: A sample of people with depression or anxiety were randomised to usual care (n=128) or computer-delivered CBT (n=146). Costs were available for 123 and 138 participants, respectively. Costs and depression scores were combined using the net benefit approach. Results: Service costs were £40 (90% CI – £28 to £ 148) higher over 8 months for computer-delivered CBT. Lost-employment costs were £407 (90% CI £196 to £586) less for this group. Valuing a 1-unit improvement on the Beck Depression Inventory at £40, there is an 81% chance that computer-delivered CBT is cost-effective, and it revealed a highly competitive cost per quality-adjusted life year. Conclusions: Computer-delivered CBT has a high probability of being cost-effective, even if a modest value is placed on unit improvements in depression.

Item Type: Article
Official URL: http://bjp.rcpsych.org
Additional Information: © 2004 Royal College of Psychiatrists
Divisions: Social Policy
Personal Social Services Research Unit
LSE Health
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Sets: Departments > Social Policy
Research centres and groups > Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU)
Research centres and groups > LSE Health
Research centres and groups > NIHR School for Social Care Research
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2008 14:33
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2020 03:03
URI: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/15086

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item